A Note from the Library: Smellie’s 'Treatise on Midwifery': A debate between theory and practice

Published by Erin Newton “William Smellie,” photoprint. Accessed 1/8/2020. <http://resource.nlm.nih.gov/101429306&gt; William Smellie (1697-1763) is often referred to as the father of British obstetrics. He spent most of his long career overseeing and assisting in birth, reconciling the health of both mother and child in hundreds of cases. During this time, he developed a number of … Continue reading A Note from the Library: Smellie’s 'Treatise on Midwifery': A debate between theory and practice

A Note from the Library: One Hit Wonder of 1698

Published by Nada Abdelrahim Even those of us that are only slightly acquainted with the medical field can appreciate the way it has come to be an interdisciplinary practice. Medical professionals of our modern era collaborate with engineers and dieticians, psychologists and more to approach patient care in a more well rounded and successful way. … Continue reading A Note from the Library: One Hit Wonder of 1698

A Note from the Library: On Obstetrics and Gender in Tokugawa-Period Japan

Published by Erin Newton Japanese historians commonly refer to the years between 1603 and 1867 as the Tokugawa Period, named for the Tokugawa Shogun whose family ruled the country during this time. It is widely considered one of the most politically stable periods in Japanese history, during which time the economy grew steadily and the … Continue reading A Note from the Library: On Obstetrics and Gender in Tokugawa-Period Japan

A Note from the Library: De Medicina—A Complete Medical Text for its Time

Published by Nada Abdelrahim Above Left: Spine view, De medicina. Alter, ut ab almeloveenio editus est. A. 1713. Above Right: Back view, De medicina. Alter, ut ab almeloveenio editus est. A. 1713. Originally written in the first century CE, the copy of De Medicina in the IMSS’s library is “newer”— from 1713—written almost sixteen centuries … Continue reading A Note from the Library: De Medicina—A Complete Medical Text for its Time

History of Physician Gender Dynamics in Obstetrics and Gynecology

Published by Anupama Suresh Painting depicting the first successful cesarean section in Latin America in 1844. By Enrique Grau. xx1995.814.3 International Museum of Surgical Science Collection When I first saw this painting, my eyes were drawn to the bloody abdominal incision. C-section,  my brain immediately informed me. Next, my gaze shifted up the umbilical cord … Continue reading History of Physician Gender Dynamics in Obstetrics and Gynecology

The Fabrication of Anatomy

Published by Annagh Devitt Most visitors to the Museum recognize something “off” about this skeleton. This ‘something’ is hard to pin down; perhaps it is the unsettling face, or the way the shoulders stick out a little too far, or maybe it is the artistic rendering of the humerus that curves like the end of … Continue reading The Fabrication of Anatomy